Category School Age

Family rules
School Age

Family rules

Family rules: why they're important Family rules are positive statements about how your family wants to look after and treat its members. Rules help: children and teenagers learn what behaviour is and isn't OK in your family adults be consistent in the way they behave towards children and teenagers. Rules can help everyone in your family get along better.

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School Age

'Beat the buzzer': morning routine game

About 'Beat the buzzer' 'Beat the buzzer' works because it rewards your child for being on time and ready in the morning. As you introduce this game into your morning routine and play it with your child, praising your child will help things along. When children get praise for behaving well or doing what you want them to do, they're likely to want to keep behaving that way.
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School Age

Bullying: how to spot the signs

What is bullying? Bullying is when children: tease other children over and over again ignore other children or leave them out of games or activities say mean things or call other children names spread nasty stories about other children hit and push other children take other children's things. Bullying can happen face to face.
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School Age

Cheating: what to do when children cheat

Cheating: why do children do it? Children cheat for several reasons. Some children might have high expectations of themselves, or they might feel other people have high expectations of them. So they cheat to meet these expectations. Some might want to win because they don't know how to cope with the disappointment of losing.
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School Age

Swearing: school-age children

Swearing: why do school-age children do it? When school-age children swear, it's usually to express negative feelings . It's often a response to something painful, upsetting or frustrating. Children might also swear to fit in socially . They might be trying to be part of the group, or to stand out by being funny or adding shock value to their talk.
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School Age

Using time-out to guide your child's behaviour

What is time-out? Time-out involves taking your child away from interesting activities and not giving your child attention for a short period of time. If your child is behaving in an unacceptable way, time-out is a strategy that can help you manage your child's behaviour. Time-out works best when it's used with other child behaviour strategies - for example, in combination with praise for acceptable behaviour.
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School Age

Your child bullying others

Bullying: the basics Most children tease others at some stage. But bullying is more than teasing. It's: teasing other children over and over again ignoring other children or leaving them out of games or activities saying mean things or calling other children names spreading nasty stories about other children hitting and pushing other children taking other children's things.
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School Age

Friends and friendships: 10 frequently asked questions

1. Is it normal to worry about my child's friends and friendships? Yes. Parents often worry about whether their children have enough friends, are happy in their friendships, are getting along well with other children and so on. These concerns are normal as your child becomes more independent and more interested in his friends.
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School Age

Supporting your child's school-age friendships

About your child's school-age friendships Your child's world gets bigger when she starts school. Relationships with other people - like the children in her class at school - become more important. Friendships are good for your school-age child's self-esteem. When your child has good friends, he feels like he belongs.
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School Age

Helping your child connect with others in the community

Why community connections are good Children who are connected to other people in their extended family, friends, neighbourhood and community have: a sense of belonging to a network, place and community opportunities to learn about getting along with others people to go to when they need help a network they can use to learn about different jobs, skills and so on.
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School Age

Connecting with your school-age child

Understanding school-age children: the basics At school, your child is busy learning and making friends . This includes trying to understand the rules of life, learning about manners, values and what's right and wrong, and finding role models like teachers and other trusted grown-ups. At the same time, your child's brain is developing rapidly, bringing increased emotional maturity, social skills and thinking abilities.
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School Age

Loss of privilege: discipline tools for kids

Loss of privilege: the basics Loss of privilege is taking away an activity or one of your child's belongings - for example, a toy - as a consequence when your child misbehaves. Some parents find that loss of privilege works well in their families. Other parents use loss of privilege rarely, or not at all.
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School Age

When someone dies: helping children cope

What children might feel when someone dies There's a big range of normal when it comes to children's feelings after a death. Many children show sadness, anger and anxiety. Some might be confused and struggle to understand what has happened. Some might not seem affected by the death at all. Or they might feel guilty that something they said or did caused the death.
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School Age

Enjoying time with your child: ways to connect

Why enjoying special time together is important When you and your child enjoy special time together, you can learn to see the world from your child's point of view. It's a chance to find out more about your child's likes and dislikes, her worries and her frustrations. Spending time together is also a way of giving your child your full attention, sending the message that he's the most important thing to you.
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School Age

Childhood sexual behaviour: school age

School-age sexual behaviour: what's typical? Sexual behaviour in your child might be a bit confronting, especially the first time you see it. It might help to know that touching, looking at and talking about bodies is a mostly typical and healthy part of your child's development. Open and honest talk about sex, bodies and relationships will help you guide your child's behaviour now.
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School Age

Death: how to talk about it with children

When to talk with children about death Once you know a loved one has died, take the time to explain this to your child as soon as you can. If your child finds out by accident, or from someone he isn't close to, he might be confused and angry. If you have more than one child in your family, you might talk with the children together or tell each child what has happened individually.
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School Age

Making time-out work for you

How to make time-out more effective: seven tips Time-out can be a good strategy to have in your child behaviour toolkit. Here are some tips for making it work well for you and your child. 1. Minimise attention during time-out or quiet time Time-out or quiet time for your child is time without your attention.
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School Age

5-6 years: child development

Child development at 5-6 years: what's happening Playing and learning Even as your child gets older and starts school, play is important. It's still how your child learns and builds social, emotional and thinking skills. Your child's pretend play is more complex now, filled with lots of fantasy and drama.
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School Age

School-age creative learning and development: what to expect

Creative play: why it's important for school-age learning and development School-age children usually take a keen interest in creative arts and artistic activities . Creative activities and creative play support your child's learning and development by: encouraging your child's creativity and visual expression helping your child to express feelings, thoughts and ideas in verbal and non-verbal ways getting your child to think about problems with more than one answer helping your child to think about issues from many perspectives encouraging your child to use materials and media to solve problems.
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School Age

Family rules

Family rules: why they're important Family rules are positive statements about how your family wants to look after and treat its members. Rules help: children and teenagers learn what behaviour is and isn't OK in your family adults be consistent in the way they behave towards children and teenagers. Rules can help everyone in your family get along better.
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School Age

Dental care for school-age children

Teeth development Most children have a full set of 20 baby teeth by the time they're three. Children usually start losing their baby teeth from around six years of age . From 6-12 years, children have a mixture of adult and baby teeth. The baby molars are replaced around 12 years of age. By about 12, most children have all their adult teeth except for the third molars (wisdom teeth).
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